America’s Drug Problem: Maps Of Drug Flow Into The United States

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By Shem El-Jamal

It is said that addiction is a sickness of the soul. If this is true, then the United States appears to be the center of the world’s illness.

For a long time, the U.S. has been the most faithful customer of illegal drugs. To foreign countries, Americans are often thought of as too wealthy and privileged to know how damaged and distorted our society is. Though some may be offended at such an impression of American society, according to notable history, the impression is accurate.

The apparently ravenous addiction of many Americans to illegal narcotics is theorized to come from a number of different factors. However, the central cause appears to be our pour state of mental, emotional, physical, and spiritual health. Instead of solving the numerous problems which typical plague us in modern society, it seems that many Americans take the easy way out, and escape their various problems with powerful and dangerous narcotics.

Related links – Pablo Escobar’s Son Reveals His Dad “Worked for the CIA Selling Cocaine” – Media Silent

We could go into specific detail about the causes of addiction itself. However, for now, we will simply focus upon why these drugs have been so readily available for Americans to consume.


16 Maps Of Drug Flow Into The United States

By Michal B Kelley, Business Insider

Originally Published July 8, 2012

Despite growing momentum for drug policy reform in Latin America, continual carnage in Mexico and a U.S. government-sponsored study that rips U.S. drug policy, America’s 40-year war on drugs is still raging.

This week retired Colombian police Gen. Mauricio Santoyo turned himself in to the DEA on charges that he helped drug gangs and right-wing paramilitaries smuggle cocaine to Mexico and the U.S. while he was the head of security for the president of Colombia.

We’ve covered how cocaine gets from the fields in Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia to the world’s largest drug market.

Related links – Entire Florida Police Dept Busted Laundering Tens of Millions for International Drug Cartels

The U.N.’s World Drug Report 2012 showed us how the U.S. has high demand for marijuana, cocaine and painkillers. Ironically, the more America spends on the drug war, the cheaper drugs become.

All this got us thinking about how drugs make it from Latin America to American cities, so we put together a series of maps to get a better idea.

Most of the drugs that enter the U.S. come from Central and South America

Mexico is the transit zone between the biggest source of drugs and the biggest consumer

95 percent of American cocaine imports are brought by Mexican cartels through Mexico and Central America

Source: New York Times: “Numbers Tell of Failure in Drug War”

The drugs are shipped in a variety of ways

STRATFOR

And flow through a variety of cartels

STRATFOR

Despite wars between cartels, most shipments make it through Mexico to the U.S. border

STRATFOR

Here’s a look at which cartels tends to handle which drugs (though the dominant Zetas are conspicuously missing on this map)

STRATFOR

The battle to control the border claims the most lives

As a comparison, here’s how heroin makes it to its largest markets

Demand is geographically skewed in the U.S. as the West prefers methamphetamine (red) and the east prefers cocaine (blue)

The supply routes for meth follow the demand

Marijuana distribution, like preference for it, is more balanced

And the same goes for heroin

Here are the aggregate answers from local law enforcement agencies when asked: “What drug poses the greatest threat to your area?”

Read more at: BusinessInsider.com


We may look at each of these maps and wonder just what kind of country would allow such an enormous flow of drug traffic into its borders. We might be familiar with the allegations and suggestions from numerous researchers and media outlets that the CIA was (and in many cases, still is) responsible for directly supporting foreign drug trade from South America, through Mexico, and into the U.S.

The son of infamous Columbian drug lord, Pablo Escobar, is now on record confessing that as his father was causes untold amounts of suffering and death through cocaine sales (circa 1970 through the late 1980s), Pablo was working for the CIA the entire time.

To add, the fact that the U.S. military has actively assisted opium farmers in Afganistan for years also supports the fact that in most cases, U.S. officials did not intend to stop the ongoing global drug trade at all. Rather, they intended to profit off of it.

Further supporting this claim is the fact that Big Pharma is making big profits off of the exact same dangerous narcotics which authorities claim are hazardous and illegal to be sold on American street. From these observations, we may realize that the opium trade is not at all isolated to Asian countries, as our history books may tell us. This trade has been commercialized and set up to yield high profits for doctors and pharmaceutical companies. This is yet another case where the illegal drug trade equates to big money for corporate interests and their official subordinates in government.

By observations, it appears as though past (and many present) U.S. officials were more interested in profiting off of the destruction of the world caused by massive drug trafficking operations. While Western televisions broadcasted a message that the American public should say no to drugs, CIA and government officials were actually looking for ways to make these drugs and the deadly gangs who were producing them more profitable and available on American streets.

There is much more to discuss about this issue. However, for now, we may simply acknowledge the grossly problematic situation within the past and present U.S. establishment.

This article (Maps Of Drug Flow Into The United States) was originally published on Discerning the Mystery and syndicated by The Event Chronicle

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