Statement from President Donald J. Trump on the Passage of H.R. 2664, H.R. 2480, and H.R. 2200

The White House
Office of the Press Secretary

For Immediate Release

July 12, 2017

Statement from President Donald J. Trump on the Passage of H.R. 2664, H.R. 2480, and H.R. 2200

My Administration is focused on ending the horrific practice of human trafficking, and the three bills the House of Representatives passed today are important steps forward. Since taking office, I have met with courageous survivors, non-profit groups, and faith leaders who are devoting tremendous energy to raising awareness about human trafficking. I am hopeful that the Senate will take up and pass these three bills as soon as possible and I look forward to my continued work with the Congress on this important issue.

This article (Statement from President Donald J. Trump on the Passage of H.R. 2664, H.R. 2480, and H.R. 2200) was originally published on The White House.

More Information:

H.R. 2664 — Enhancing Detection of Human Trafficking Act

To direct the Secretary of Labor to train certain Department of Labor personnel how to effectively detect and assist law enforcement in preventing human trafficking during the course of their primary roles and responsibilities, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the “Enhancing Detection of Human Trafficking Act”.

SEC. 2. DEFINITION OF HUMAN TRAFFICKING.

In this Act the term “human trafficking” means an act or practice described in paragraph (9) or (10) of section 103 of the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000 (22 U.S.C. 7102).

SEC. 3. TRAINING FOR DEPARTMENT PERSONNEL TO IDENTIFY HUMAN TRAFFICKING.

(a) In General.—Not later than 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of Labor shall implement a program to—

(1) train and periodically retrain relevant personnel across the Department of Labor that the Secretary considers appropriate, how to effectively detect and assist law enforcement in preventing human trafficking during the course of their primary roles and responsibilities; and

(2) ensure that such personnel regularly receive current information on matters related to the detection of human trafficking, including information that becomes available outside of the Department’s initial or periodic retraining schedule, to the extent relevant to their official duties and consistent with applicable information and privacy laws.

(b) Training Described.—The training referred to in subsection (a) may be conducted through in-class or virtual learning capabilities, and shall include—

(1) methods for identifying suspected victims of human trafficking and, where appropriate, perpetrators of human trafficking;

(2) training that is most appropriate for a particular location or environment in which the personnel receiving such training perform their official duties;

(3) other topics determined by the Secretary to be appropriate reflecting current trends and best practices for personnel in their particular location or professional environment;

(4) a clear course of action for referring potential cases of human trafficking to the Department of Justice and other appropriate authorities; and

(5) a post-training evaluation for personnel receiving the training.

SEC. 4. REPORT TO CONGRESS.

Not later than 1 year after the date of the enactment of this Act, and each year thereafter, the Secretary of Labor shall report to the appropriate congressional committees on the training provided to the personnel referred to in section 3(a), including—

(1) an evaluation of such training and the overall effectiveness of the program required by this Act;

(2) the number of cases referred by Department of Labor personnel in which human trafficking was suspected and the metrics used by the Department to accurately measure and track its response to instances of suspected human trafficking; and

(3) the number of Department of Labor employees who have completed such training as required by this Act.

Passed the House of Representatives July 12, 2017.

Attest:

Clerk.  


H.R. 2480 — Empowering Law Enforcement to Fight Sex Trafficking Demand Act

To amend the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 to include an additional permissible use of amounts provided as grants under the Byrne JAG program, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the “Empowering Law Enforcement to Fight Sex Trafficking Demand Act”.

SEC. 2. ADDITIONAL AUTHORIZED USE OF BYRNE JAG FUNDS.

Section 501(a)(1) of the Omnibus Crime Control and Safe Streets Act of 1968 (42 U.S.C. 3751(a)(1)) is amended by adding at the end the following:

“(I) Programs to combat human trafficking (including programs to reduce the demand for trafficked persons).”.

Passed the House of Representatives July 12, 2017.

Attest:

Clerk.  


H.R. 2200 — Frederick Douglass Trafficking Victims Prevention and Protection Reauthorization Act of 2017

To reauthorize the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

This Act may be cited as the “Frederick Douglass Trafficking Victims Prevention and Protection Reauthorization Act of 2017”.

SEC. 2. TABLE OF CONTENTS.

The table of contents for this Act is as follows:

Sec. 1. Short title.
Sec. 2. Table of contents.

TITLE I—COMBATING TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS IN THE UNITED STATES


Sec. 101. Grants to assist in the recognition of trafficking.

Sec. 102. Preventing future trafficking in the United States through receipt of complaints abroad.

Sec. 103. Modification to grants for victims services.


Sec. 111. Required training to prevent human trafficking for certain contracting air carriers.

Sec. 112. Priority for use of funds for lodging expenses at accommodations lacking certain policies relating to child sexual exploitation.

Sec. 113. Ensuring United States procurement does not fund human trafficking.

Sec. 114. Training course on human trafficking and Government contracting.

Sec. 115. Modifications to the advisory council on human trafficking.

Sec. 116. Sense of Congress on strengthening Federal efforts to reduce demand.

Sec. 117. Sense of Congress on the senior policy operating group.


Sec. 121. Demand reduction strategies in the United States.

Sec. 122. Designation of a labor prosecutor to enhance State and local efforts to combat trafficking in persons.

Sec. 123. Preventing human trafficking in foreign missions and diplomatic households.

Sec. 124. Ensuring that traffickers help pay for care for victims.


Sec. 131. Sense of Congress.

Sec. 132. Report on the enforcement of section 307 of the Tariff Act of 1930.

Sec. 133. Modification to list of child-made and slavery-made goods.

TITLE II—FIGHTING HUMAN TRAFFICKING ABROAD


Sec. 201. Including the Secretary of the Treasury and the United States Trade Representative as a member of the interagency task force to monitor and combat trafficking.

Sec. 202. Encouraging countries to maintain and share data on human trafficking efforts.

Sec. 203. Appropriate listing of governments involved in human trafficking.

Sec. 204. Requirements for strategies to prevent trafficking.

Sec. 205. Expansion of Department of State rewards program.

Sec. 206. Briefing on countries with primarily migrant workforces.

Sec. 207. Report on recipients of funding from the United States Agency for International Development.


Sec. 211. Findings.

Sec. 212. Amendments to the Child Soldiers Prevention Act of 2008.

TITLE III—AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS

Sec. 301. Authorization of appropriations under the Trafficking Victims Protection Act of 2000.
Sec. 302. Authorization of appropriations under the Trafficking Victims Protection Reauthorization Act of 2005.

Sec. 303. Authorization of appropriations for enhancing efforts to combat the trafficking of children.

Sec. 304. Authorization of appropriations under the International Megan’s Law.

Sec. 305. Authorization of appropriations for airport personnel training to identify and report human trafficking victims.

3 Comments

  1. At last, some semblance of something positive happening. Still not convinced about Trump though. Too many Cabal in his cabinet

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